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Young Hentry's 'green' beer tasing selection

Young Henrys: Making the world healthier, one ‘green’ beer at a time

In the heart of inner-city Newtown, a popular scene for music, arts and culture, you will find Young Henrys, a microbrewery and distillery doing things a little differently, including using algae to make their ‘green’ beer! 

A local institution with rockstar status 

What started as a conversation over a beer in a bar about how the Australian beer scene had become a little stagnant, led to owner-operators Richard and Oscar opening Young Henrys. A brewery that uses innovative brewing techniques, has a sharp focus on sustainability and works with bands such as the Foo Fighters and magazines like Rolling Stones magazine to team up and collaborate to make green beer together.

Enjoying sustainably brewed 'green' beer
credit: Young Henrys

Taking environmental responsibility 

Established in 2012, Richard and Oscar set out to run Young Henry the way they saw fit; taking responsibility for their output. They aimed to operate all areas of the business in the most sustainable way possible, from the brewing process right through to how their beer is consumed. 

Brewing ‘green’ beer with green algae

While not what you first picture when you hear the term ‘green’ beer, Young Henrys Brewers have been using algae to produce beer and reduce the carbon footprint on your glass of beer! 

The fermentation process in beer production releases large amounts of carbon dioxide. It takes a tree about two days to absorb the carbon dioxide released from producing one six-pack of beer. At Young Henrys, its cultivated algae absorbs the carbon dioxide released and produces the same amount of oxygen as 2.5 acres of wilderness. 

green algae as a part of the brewing process
credit: Young Henrys

More ‘green’ beer makes for happy cattle 

A major by-product of the brewing process is spent (used) grain, and since their very first brew, Young Henrys have been donating 100% of their spent grain to local farmers. These protein and fibre-rich beer-brewing leftovers are excellent feed for cattle, support farmers in years of drought and are a perfect way to close the loop on sustainable practices. 

Sustainability behind the screens and out in front 

A large part of Young Henrys philosophy is having a light step on the environment. This includes everything from the brewing process to how the beer is served to customers. All packaged beer is sold in cans, as Young Henrys believe this is better for the environment. Aluminium cans are lightweight and can be stacked more efficiently than bottles. More beer on every pallet means less transport emissions because you can fit more on each delivery. Brewery patrons are encouraged to use one growler multiple times by simply bringing them up for refills at the bar.  

The brewery installed solar panels on its warehouse roof and runs 25% of its energy needs from the sun. By the end of 2021, Young Henrys have a target to be 100% powered by renewable energy – and they also claim solar-powered beer tastes better!

A ‘green’ drink selection for everyone 

A few years ago, Young Henrys began distilling cider, gin and whisky and now offer a wide range. The brewery is a great place to lose yourself in an afternoon, particularly for the eco-conscious consumers who will be happy knowing every sip they take is supporting the world to become a healthier place.  

Credit: Young Henrys

Where?

76 Wilford Street, Newtown, NSW
www.younghenrys.com

When?         

Tasting Bar is open 7 days a week from midday to 7pm
Behind the scenes tours are offered on appointment 
The brewery is dog-friendly 

Check out other sustainable food and drink recommendations here –

Kellie Floyd
As a freelance writer with a passion (AKA obsession) for travel, Kellie feels right at home in her hiking boots and with a pack strapped to her back! She believes our world deeply needs everyone in its corner, and you will often find her writing about sustainable practices that families can easily incorporate into everyday life. If Kellie isn't writing or off exploring nature, you will find her with a coffee in hand, reading about destinations she is yet to discover in the world… but knows she will one day!