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Adelaide Botanic Garden

Adelaide Botanic Garden: Beautiful gardens based on a sound conservation ethos

Adelaide Botanic Garden offers 50-hectares of gorgeous greenery for loved ones to relax and connect in the heart of Adelaide. A beautiful space filled with native and exotic plants – who could say no to leisurely strolling around the grounds?

Adelaide Botanic Garden
image: Botanic Gardens of South Australia

Firm ethos built on conservation

Within the Adelaide CBD and easily accessible (including wheelchair access) stands the Adelaide Botanic Garden. The Garden offers a space for individuals to relax and unwind during a lunch break or spend a whole day getting lost in the wealth of plant species on display around the grounds. With a vision to create a community who are passionate about sustainability and actively contribute to the effort, Adelaide Botanic Garden is fuelled to aid in individual understanding and appreciation of the natural world. Through this, the Garden hosts additional interactive and educational activities for individuals to learn about how to create their own kitchen garden and learn about carnivorous plants, just to name two of the incredible options currently available.
see: https://www.botanicgardens.sa.gov.au/whats-on for more information

Immerse yourself in Adelaide Botanic Garden

The Garden is a living collection of breath-taking plants from across the globe, with species ranging in conservation status. It is a beautiful and tranquil space where you can spend time reconnecting with nature, no matter the time you have. Enjoy admiring the plants whilst a hot chocolate warms your hands on a cool winter day or with the sun on your back in the warmer months. There are plants of all sizes and shapes growing outdoors, such as in the Australian Forest and Palm Collection, as well as in indoor areas, like the Bicentennial Conservatory and Amazon Waterlily Pavilion. The combination of both outdoor and indoor areas allow the Garden to conserve a larger variety of plant species. As well as living plants, there is the Santos Museum of Economic Botany displaying a permanent collection. A considerable amount of this collection being the original museum display over 100 years old. Don’t worry if you find yourself hungry whilst exploring what the Garden has to offer, Café Fibonacci and Simpson Kiosk are there to satisfy your grumbling stomach.

Adelaide Botanic Garden
image: Botanic Gardens of South Australia

Active conservation and future thinking

The mission of the Adelaide Botanic Garden has led to their involvement with multiple conservation and preservation projects. Additionally, there has been a large focus for the Garden to be participating in science communication with inclusive programs for young children through to adults (as mentioned above). One of the many great projects the Garden has been involved with is the collection of the seeds from native species to be kept in a long-term seed bank on-site. Currently, 70% of the threatened plant species in South Australia are stored in this bank. This process enables the potential use of these seeds in the future in efforts to restore native habitats. One exciting current restoration project involves growing threatened South Australian orchids within the nursery and, once ready, they will be translocated into the wild to restore their natural populations. With programmes like these, it may be possible to reduce the current impact that development is having on biodiversity.

Adelaide Botanic Garden Preserves and protects

The Garden is a free public garden that is accessible for all to enjoy. It offers a place to stretch your legs during a lunch break or spend the day with a picnic basket and a good book. The Garden is not only committed to conserving plant species but to actively providing a service for individuals to access nature within the city limits. Through their rich ethos involving education, sustainability and conservation, the Garden is focused on empowering individuals to have a positive impact on the natural environment. With services like the Garden there is hope that future generations will be able to experience the beautiful botany that we are able to today.

Waterlilies at Adelaide Botanic Garden
image: Botanic Gardens of South Australia

Read more about sustainable businesses and activities in Adelaide here.

Emily Costello
Thanks to her curious nature, Emily has found a passion for sustainability and engaging with others through science communication. Emily enjoys reading novels, getting creative in the kitchen using seasonal produce and exploring the natural spaces of South Australia with loved ones.